Tax Changes for September 2017

Tax Changes for September 2017

Tax Rate Changes for September 2017

Only two states have tax changes for September 2017.

Sales Tax Rate changes in West Virginia

Tax rates changes were noted in Wayne and Wardensville counties effective September 1, 2017.

Find more information on West Virginia Sales Tax Rates:

West Virginia Sales Tax Rates 

September Sales Tax Rate Changes in Alabama

In the State of Alabama tax rate changes in September include the counties of Allgood and Greenville.

For the latest sales tax rates by state, visit our interactive sales tax rates by state page.

Find more information on Alabama Sales Tax Rates:

Alabama Sales Tax Rates 

ZIP Code Changes by State

There were 8 states with ZIP code changes effective after August 2017. These states with ZIP code changes include Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Minnesota, Ohio, Puerto Rico and Texas.

Tax Rate Changes for September 2017

Sales Tax Calculator & Software

To easily calculate sales tax rates by state for your business, visit Zip2Tax.com.  Let Zip2Tax be the tax specialist for your company, freeing you to concentrate on what you are good at – growing your business.

For August’s changes click here.

In the State of Alabama tax rate changes in September include the counties of Allgood and Greenville.

Exemption certificates need to be reviewed for validity

Exemption certificates

Do you know the validity period of your exemption certificates? Did you know that each state treats them differently and that you should review them periodically to make sure they are still good?

It is a good business practice to periodically review exemption certificates because quite a few states claim their exemption certificates are good until the business has a change, the business closes, or the certificate is revoked. You won’t know if these conditions are met unless you check with your customers and vendors regularly and request updated exemption certificates from them.

Some states have no stated expiration for their exemption certificates but they recommend regular or periodic updates. In these cases we listed the least amount of time between recommended updates. In cases where the state listed “good until the exemption no longer applies” we stated that there was no expiration date. Other states note that exemption certificates are good forever however “exempt status must be renewed”, or they “recommend” updates. In these cases we noted the recommended update or renewal timeframe.

Exemption Certificate Validity

StateAbbrev.Validity Period
AlabamaALTill Changed Or Revoked
AlaskaAKNA – No Certificates
ArizonaAZDate On Certificate
ArkansasARNA – No Certificates
CaliforniaCATill Changed Or Revoked
ColoradoCONo Expiration
ConnecticutCT3 Years
DelawareDENA – No Certificates
District Of ColumbiaDCTill Changed Or Revoked
>FloridaFL5 Years
GeorgiaGATill Changed Or Revoked
HawaiiHITill Changed Or Revoked
IdahoIDNo Expiration
IllinoisIL5 Years
IndianaINNo Expiration
IowaIA5 Years
KansasKSTill Changed Or Revoked
KentuckyKYTill Changed Or Revoked
LouisianaLA3 Years
MaineMETill Changed Or Revoked
MarylandMD5 Years
MassachusettsMANo Expiration
MichiganMI4 Years
MinnesotaMN3 Years
MississippiMSNA – No Certificates
MissouriMO5 Years
MontanaMTNA – No Certificates
NebraskaNENo Expiration
NevadaNV5 Years
New HampshireNHNA – No Certificates
New JerseyNJ5 Years
New MexicoNMNo Expiration
New YorkNYTill Changed Or Revoked
North CarolinaNCNo Expiration
North DakotaNDNo Expiration
OhioOHNo Expiration
OklahomaOK3 Years
OregonORNA – No Certificates
PennsylvaniaPA3 Years
Rhode IslandRINo Expiration
South CarolinaSCTill Changed Or Revoked
South DakotaSD1 Year
TennesseeTNTill Changed Or Revoked
TexasTXNo Expiration
UtahUT1 Year
VermontVTNo Expiration
VirginiaVATill Changed Or Revoked
WashingtonWA1 Year
West VirginiaWV1 Year
WisconsinWI5 Years
WyomingWYNo Expiration

Sales tax rates and use tax changes for July 2015

Sales tax rates – July 2015

Sales tax rates have changed in 20 states and Puerto Rico and there were 13 states with ZIP code changes in Zip2Tax products since June 2015. Sales and or use tax rates are changed in Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Colorado, Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Minnesota, Missouri, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and West Virginia.

In Alabama, tax rates changed for Cedar Bluff and Fairview.

In Arkansas, tax rates changed for El Dorado, Manila, Moorefield and Ouichita County.

In Arizona, tax rates changed for Graham County and the city of Marana.

In California, tax rates changed for the city of Weed.

In Colorado, tax rates changed for Georgetown.

In Georgia, tax rates changed for the counties of Muscogee and Whitfield.

In Iowa, tax rates changed for Lone Tree, Solon, Hills, Swisher and West Branch.

In Illinois, tax rates changed for Carbon Cliff, Carbondale, Coulterville, Crestwood, Deland, Elkville, Glenwood, Highwood, La Grange, Lyons, Montgomery, Morrison, Oglesby, Rantoul, Rock Falls, Toledo, Wadsworth, Westmont, and the counties of Calhoun, Greene, Jefferson, Jersey, Jo Davies, Knox, McDonough, Morgan, Perry, Piatt, Scott, White and Whiteside.

In Kansas, the state rate changed and there were tax rates changes for Clifton, Hutchinson, Lyndon, Marquette, and the counties of Gove, Morton, and Nemaha.

In Louisiana, tax rates changed for Winn Parish, Claiborne Parish, and Calcasieu Parish.

In Minnesota, tax rates changed for Hubbard County.

In Missouri, tax rates changed for Cape Girardeau, Hold County, Lawrence County, Buffalo, California, Concordia, Hannibal and Saint Joseph.

In New Mexico, tax rates changed for the counties of Bernalillo, Chaves, Dona Ana, Luna, Roosevelt, San Miguel, Santa Fe, Sierra, Torrance, Valencia, and the cities of Artesia, Sliver City, and Kirtland.

In Ohio, tax rates changed for the county of Richland.

In Oklahoma, tax rates changed for Barnsdall, Castle, Clinton, Colbert, Commerce, Foster, Rattan, Vici and the counties of Custer and Cotton.

In Puerto Rico, the possession tax rate changed.

In South Dakota, tax rates changed for Columbia and Westport.

In Texas, tax rates changed for Garrett, Sandy Oaks and Kendleton.

In Utah, tax rates changed for Farmington.

In Washington, tax rates changed for Sequim TBD and Dayton TBD.

In West Virginia, tax rates changed for Bolivar, Charles Town, Charleston, Martinsburg, Milton, Nitro, Parkersburg, Ranson, Thomas, Vienna and Wheeling.

There were 13 states with ZIP code changes effective after June 2015 including Alabama, Arizona, California, Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Montana, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, South Dakota, and Utah. A PDF document enumerating ZIP code additions and deletions can be made available upon request.

For June’s changes click here.

Angel Downs, Zip2Tax's ead tax researcher

Angel Downs, Zip2Tax’s lead tax researcher

Amazon’s vested interest in universal online sales tax

universal online sales tax

universal online sales tax

Marketplace-Fairness-Act
With the addition of a new Amazon distribution center in Kenosha, WI, the number one largest online retailer will soon be collecting sales tax from almost 50% of the American population.

Amazon will begin collecting Wisconsin sales taxes on Nov. 1 and the state expects to benefit to the tune of $30 million per year.

universal online sales tax

Beginning Nov. 1st, Wisconsin will become the 14th state Amazon collects sales tax for. The mega-retailer has arrangements to add at least 6 more states to that list over the next 3 years.

Amazon currently has nexus is 18 states. Nexus, a physical in-state business presence, has long been the determining factor behind which businesses have to collect sales tax. Nexus is created by brick and mortar stores, distribution centers or warehouses, call centers,  offices, sales people, and sometimes just by sending an employee to a convention.

The mega-retailer already collects sales taxes in Arizona, California, Georgia, Kansas, Kentucky, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, Washington and West Virginia. Amazon has a physical presence in all of those states except for Georgia and New York.

Georgia passed a law in January requiring all online retailers doing business within the state to collect sales taxes and Amazon complied starting last September. New York won a court appeal upholding the state’s right to claim nexus is created when an out-of-state retailer pays in-state affiliates a commission to promote their products or services. New York refers to this as “click-through nexus”.

Amazon shut down its Connecticut affiliate program back in 2011 to avoid click-through nexus in that state but may be thinking about restarting the program as it recently announced that it will begin to collect Connecticut sales taxes and invest $50 million over the next two years for a jobs initiative.

Amazon has distribution centers in New Hampshire and Delaware where neither state has a sales tax. It also has centers in Indiana, Massachusetts and Nevada and has agreed to begin collecting sales tax in these states in the near future.

Amazon has acknowledged that it has nexus in Tennessee and South Carolina, but made special deals with those states which allow it to postpone sales tax collections for a time. Tennessee Gov. Haslam agreed to hold off on an Amazon tax until 2014 if the retailer agreed to send notifications to all customers about how much tax they owed on their purchases going back through 2012. South Carolina made a deal that exempts the company until 2016 in return for a promised distribution center and its 1,200 jobs. The state left itself an escape clause saying the agreement would be nullified should the Marketplace Fairness Act pass and create a standardized set of federal regulations.

This patchwork of regulations, state-by-state agreements and endless legal battles seems to be the main impetus behind Amazon’s support for the Marketplace Fairness Act or universal online sales tax. This law would significantly ease Amazon’s burdens while simultaneously increasing the burden on other smaller online retailers. Amazon stands to significantly widen its lead over the competition.

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