Sales tax change frequency by state

Zip2Tax compares the sales tax change frequency of the states. Ever wonder how your state measures up?

It’s generally accepted that there are around 11,000 sales tax jurisdictions across this great and diverse country of ours. This fact alone would seem to be a fairly reasonable argument for the outsourcing of sales and use tax rates from a company such as Zip2Tax. As the head of marketing for Zip2Tax I am always trying to understand our customer’s needs better. I found myself wondering about the sales tax change frequency for all these jurisdictions. I mean, 11,000 rows in a document might be manageable if they only changed their rates every few years or so, right?

So I sat down and with my trusty Excel spread sheet and a large cup of strong coffee and started going back through our research documentation counting the number of months that there had been any sales tax changes in each state. I wanted to determine which states had the highest sales tax change frequency. I sampled a three-year period from December 2015 going back through January 2013.

… fully one-third of the time that these states CAN make sales or use tax rate changes, they DO.

When the numbers were crunched I had some surprises in store, to be sure. For one, the states that provide Zip2Tax with the most new customers have no obvious correlation with which states had the highest sales tax change frequency. In fact, California and New York were only slightly above average.

The standout in this sample was Alabama which turned out to be far and away the leader with changes in 30 out of the 36 months – that’s 83% of the time. This also helped to dash my hopes of discovering a hotbed of customer need for our product since Alabama has so far not proven to be a great source of new business.
sales tax change frequency

Arizona came in second with 14 changes over that same period. Georgia, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas all tie for third place with 13 sales tax rate changes over 36 months. That translates to mean that fully one-third of the time that these states CAN make sales or use tax rate changes, they DO. Not to overstate the obvious, but that is more frequently than quarterly updates.

… more than two-thirds, updated that tax a minimum of once a year, and by the end of 3 years, 86% of the states had made changes…

In fact, 68% of the states that collect a sales tax, that’s more than two-thirds, updated that tax a minimum of once a year, and by the end of 3 years, 86% of the states had made changes.

So as I drained the last of my cold coffee I felt some gratification in that even though sales tax will remain an extremely complex moving target in nearly all 50 states, at least it should mean a steady supply of customers for sales tax rate providers like Zip2Tax for the foreseeable future.

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Four states greet November with sales tax changes

Sales tax changes occurred in four states in Zip2Tax products since October 2015.

In Arizona, tax rates changed for Jerome, Sierra Vista and Mammoth.

In Tennessee, tax rates changed for Hardin County, Henry County and Dunlap.

In Wisconsin, tax rates changed for Brown County.

In Wyoming, tax rates changed for Converse County.

There were 28 states with ZIP code changes effective after October 2015 including Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina, Nebraska, New Jersey, Nevada, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Washington, Wisconsin and West Virginia. A PDF document enumerating ZIP code additions and deletions can be made available upon request.

For October’s changes click here.

Angel Downs, Zip2Tax's ead tax researcher

Angel Downs, Zip2Tax’s lead tax researcher

Sales and use tax rate changes for May 2015

Sales and/or use tax rates have changed in Zip2Tax products in Alabama and South Carolina since March 2015.

In Alabama, tax rates changed for Five Points.

In South Carolina, tax rates changed for Colleton and Georgetown Counties.

There were 7 states with ZIP code changes effective after April 2015 including Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Maine, New York, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. A PDF document enumerating ZIP code additions and deletions can be made available upon request.

For April’s changes click here.

Angel Downs

Angel Downs, Lead Tax Researcher

 

 

Sales and use tax rate changes for April 2015

Sales and use tax rate changes in Zip2Tax products in 17 states since March 2015. There have been changes in Alaska, Arkansas, California, Georgia, Kansas, Louisiana, Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina, North Dakota, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, Washington and Wyoming.

In Alaska, tax rates changed for Sitka, Skagway, Seldovia and Whittier.

In Arkansas, tax rates changed for Barling, Cherry Valley, Dermott, Evening Shade, Higginson, Lead Hill, Lockesburg, Ward, Wilmot and Mississippi County.

In California, tax rates changed for Atascadero, Benicia, Coachella, El Cerrito, Guadalupe, Paradise, Pinole, Rancho Cordova, Red Bluff, Richmond, Sausalito, Stanton, El Cajon, and Alameda, Humboldt and Monterey Counties.

In Georgia, tax rates changed for the counties of Baker, Brooks, Chattahoochee, Clinch, Habersham, Liberty, Seminole and Twiggs.

In Kansas, tax rates changed for Eureka, Hoisington, La Harpe, Melvern, Shawnee, Wellington, and the counties of Dickinson, Gove, McPherson, Rooks, and Smith.

In Louisiana, tax rates changed for Epps, Terrebonne Parish, Delhi, Forest Hill, West Monroe, Colfax and Lafayette Parish.

In Minnesota, tax rates changed for the counties of Carlton, Saint Louis, and Steele.

In Missouri, tax rates changed for Ralls, Saint Francois, and Wright Counties, Park Hills, Brookfield, Liberty, Marshfield, Portageville, and Princeton.

In North Carolina, tax rates changed for the counties of Anson and Ashe.

In North Dakota, tax rates changed for Grafton, Jamestown, Killdeer, Kindred, Underwood and Williams County.

In Nebraska, tax rates changed for Benedict, Decatur, Elwood, Stanton, Upland, Utica, Bancroft, Bassett, Burwell, Duncan, Fairbury, Howells, Minden, Nebraska City, Norfolk, Rushville, Wayne, York and Dakota County.

In Ohio, tax rates changed for the counties of Hamilton, Lucas and Mahoning.

In Oklahoma, tax rates changed for Healdton, Nicoma Park, Elk City, Owasso and Grady County.

In Texas, tax rates changed for Lake Dallas, San Elizario, Bellevue, Ennis, Muchison, Progresso, Taft and Zapata County.

In Utah, tax rates changed for American Fork, Clearfield and Washington County.

In Washington, tax rates changed for North Bend, Seattle, Tonasket, Friday Harbor and Pacific County.

In Wyoming, tax rates changed for the counties of Crook, Johnson, Washakie, and Campbell.

There were 27 states with ZIP code changes effective after March 2015 including Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina, Nebraska, New Jersey, Nevada, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, and West Virginia. A PDF document enumerating ZIP code additions and deletions can be made available upon request.

For March’s changes click here.

Angel Downs

Angel Downs, Lead Tax Researcher

Sales and use tax changes in Zip2Tax products for March 2015

Sales and/or use tax rates have changed for Alabama, Arizona, Georgia, New York and South Carolina in Zip2Tax products since February 2015.

In Alabama, tax rates changed for Level Plains, Priceville, Littleville, Brantley, and Attalla.

In Arizona, tax rates changed for Flagstaff, Camp Verde, Bisbee, Oro Valley, and Apache Junction.

In Georgia, tax rates changed for Clayton.

In New York, tax rates changed for Horning and Cornell.

In South Carolina, tax rates changed for Aiken, Anderson, and Cherokee.

There were 14 states with ZIP code changes effective after February including Colorado, Connecticut, Kansas, Massachusetts, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, Washington and the District of Columbia.

Download the full ZIP code change documentation.

For February’s changes click here.

Angel Sauer

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