Los Angeles County CA – Measure H

Measure H goes into effect October 1, 2017

Measure H, a sales tax measure to fund homeless services and prevention,  was on the ballot for Los Angeles County voters, on March 7, 2017 and was approved by the required two-thirds super majority.

The result is a 0.25% increase in the sales tax rate in Los Angeles County effective October 1st.  This will bring the rate in unincorporated Los Angeles County and incorporated cities lacking a district tax to 9.5%.

Some cities in the county, however, will not increase because they are already at the maximum combined district rate of 10.25%.  Those cities are:

  • Compton
  • Long Beach
  • Lynwood
  • Mirada
  • Pico Rivera
  • Santa Monica
  • South Gate

In the event that a local tax in the above named cities should expire, then the Measure H rate will kick in immediately.

Measure H is set to expire in ten years on September 30, 2027.

 

Tax Changes for April 2017

Eureka! California Is Not Fooling Around!

In California, tax rates are changing as of April 1, 2017 for the following 41 cities:

Belmont, Chula Vista, Clearlake, Del Mar, Downey, East Palo Alto, El Centro, Fairfax, Fortuna, Fountain Valley, Hemet, Indio, Isleton, La Palma, La Quinta, Lakeport, Loomis, Lynwood, Madera, Martinez, Menifee, Newark, Orland, Placerville, Pleasant Hill, Ridgecrest, Riverside, Santa Monica, Santa Paula, St. Helena, Stockton, Suisun City, Temecula, Tracy, Ventura, Visalia, Wasco, West Sacramento, Westminster, Yreka, Yucca Valley.

For the California counties,  tax rate changes affect Merced, Monterey, Nevada, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Sonoma and Stanislaus.

Now let’s take a look at some other states with changes.

In Alaska, ttax collectorax rates changed for Sitka, Skagway, Seldovia and Whittier.

In Alabama, tax rates changed for Double Springs, Fruithurst, Moody, Littleville and Attalla.

In Arkansas, tax rates changed for Bald Knob, Cedarville, Haskell, Judsonia, Pleasant Plains, and the counties of Searcy, Saint Francis, White and Marion.

In Georgia, tax rates changed for the counties of Douglas, Fulton, Glynn, Liberty, and Pulaski and for the city of Atlanta.

In Kansas, tax rates changed for Burrton, Dearing, Edna, Hiawatha, Howard, Luray, Manhattan, Mullinville, Rolla, Stafford, Thayer, Towanda, Yates Center and the counties of Ford, Johnson, Sumner, and Thomas.

In Louisiana, tax rates changed for Carencro and Boyce.

In Minnesota, tax rates changed for Lake County.

In Missouri, tax rates changed for the counties of Benton, Douglas, Reynolds and Jackson and the cities of Granby, Greenville, Hallsville, Hartville, Overland, Rogersville, Vinita Park, and Wood Heights.

In North Carolina, tax rates changed for Wake County.

In Nebraska, tax rates changed for Beaver Crossing, Clarkson, Edison, Fort Calhoun, Greeley, Pilger, Blue Hill Central City, Fairfield, Chappell, Crete, and Pawnee City.

In Nevada, tax rates changed for the counties of Washoe and Clark.

In Ohio, tax rates changed for the counties of Lorain and Holmes.

In Oklahoma, tax rates changed for the counties of Mayes, Atoka, and Beckham and the cities of Healdton, Porum, Gate and Cyril.

In Texas, tax rates changed for Annetta North, Gustine, El Cenizo, Ivanhoe, Streetman, Kingsbury, Hughes Springs, and Sunset Valley.

In Utah, tax rates changed for the counties of Summit, Grand, and Millard and the cities of Millcreek, Payson, and Cedar Hills.

In Washington, tax rates changed for Snohomish County RTA, Spokane County RTA, King County RTA, Pierce County RTA, Kalama, Cowlitz County, Kitsap County, and Lincoln County.

In Wisconsin, tax rates changed for Kewaunee County.

In Wyoming, tax rates changed for the counties of Laramie, Hot Springs, Park, and Teton.

bitcoin tax

Phew!  If that isn’t enough change for you, here are 31 states with ZIP code changes.

Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, Mississippi, Montana, North Carolina, Nebraska, New Mexico, Nevada, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin, and West Virginia

Sales tax data as easy as 1, 2 or 3!

We can help you keep up-to-date on sales and use tax changes.  See a side by side comparison of three different data services Zip2Tax has available.
Online Lookup | Database Interface | .CSV Tax Tables

Call my good friend Teresa today 1-866-492-8494 or email her at Info@Zip2Tax.com.

Well, I’m dog tired from all this research.  Until next month……….
french1

B.D. French, Zip2Tax Research Assistant

Tax Changes for November 2016

Sales and/or use tax rates have changed in Zip2Tax products since the October updates.

In Alabama, tax rates changed for the cities of Coffeeville and York.  

  • The Coffeeville official notice can be found here.
  • The York official notice can be found here.

In Arizona, tax rates changed for the City of Globe.

  • The Mayor and Council of the City of Globe passed Ordinance No. 834. which amended the City Tax Code to increase the tax rate on retail sales from two percent (2%) to two and three-tenths percent (2.3%).  More details here AZ DOR.

zip-codes-picture

 

There were 16 states with ZIP code changes…

……in Arizona, California, Connecticut, DC, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Minnesota, North Carolina, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Puerto Rico, Texas, and Wisconsin.

 

Until next month, best regards!

B.D. French, Researcher

B.D. French, Tax Researcher

Sales tax change frequency by state

Zip2Tax compares the sales tax change frequency of the states. Ever wonder how your state measures up?

It’s generally accepted that there are around 11,000 sales tax jurisdictions across this great and diverse country of ours. This fact alone would seem to be a fairly reasonable argument for the outsourcing of sales and use tax rates from a company such as Zip2Tax. As the head of marketing for Zip2Tax I am always trying to understand our customer’s needs better. I found myself wondering about the sales tax change frequency for all these jurisdictions. I mean, 11,000 rows in a document might be manageable if they only changed their rates every few years or so, right?

So I sat down and with my trusty Excel spread sheet and a large cup of strong coffee and started going back through our research documentation counting the number of months that there had been any sales tax changes in each state. I wanted to determine which states had the highest sales tax change frequency. I sampled a three-year period from December 2015 going back through January 2013.

… fully one-third of the time that these states CAN make sales or use tax rate changes, they DO.

When the numbers were crunched I had some surprises in store, to be sure. For one, the states that provide Zip2Tax with the most new customers have no obvious correlation with which states had the highest sales tax change frequency. In fact, California and New York were only slightly above average.

The standout in this sample was Alabama which turned out to be far and away the leader with changes in 30 out of the 36 months – that’s 83% of the time. This also helped to dash my hopes of discovering a hotbed of customer need for our product since Alabama has so far not proven to be a great source of new business.
sales tax change frequency

Arizona came in second with 14 changes over that same period. Georgia, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas all tie for third place with 13 sales tax rate changes over 36 months. That translates to mean that fully one-third of the time that these states CAN make sales or use tax rate changes, they DO. Not to overstate the obvious, but that is more frequently than quarterly updates.

… more than two-thirds, updated that tax a minimum of once a year, and by the end of 3 years, 86% of the states had made changes…

In fact, 68% of the states that collect a sales tax, that’s more than two-thirds, updated that tax a minimum of once a year, and by the end of 3 years, 86% of the states had made changes.

So as I drained the last of my cold coffee I felt some gratification in that even though sales tax will remain an extremely complex moving target in nearly all 50 states, at least it should mean a steady supply of customers for sales tax rate providers like Zip2Tax for the foreseeable future.

Fill in the sign up form below this blog to receive our monthly newsletter and get alerted when one of these states makes a sales or use tax change or other important tax-related information.

 

Sales and use tax changes for October 2015

Sales and use tax rates have changed in 16 states in Zip2Tax products since September 2015.

In Alaska, tax rates changed for Sitka, Skagway, Seldovia and Whittier.

In Alabama, tax rates changed for Tallapoosa County, Grove Hill, Fayette, Evergreen and Dodge City.

In Arkansas, tax rates changed for Brinkley, El Dorado, and Western Grove.

In California, tax rates changed for Greenbrae and Monterey.

In Kansas, tax rates changed for Andover, Belleville, Buhler, Cherryvale, Eudora, Haven, LaCrosse, Lecompton, Meriden and Bourbon County.

In Louisiana, tax rates changed for Folsom.

In Minnesota, tax rates changed for Lyon and Scott Counties.

In Missouri, tax rates changed for Dent County, Salem, Henry County, Laclede County, New Madrid County, Sedalia, Bertrand, Bethany, Concordia, Country Club Hills, Crystal City, Fair Play, Galena, Hazelwood, Kirkwood, Miner, Rolla, St. John, Stanberry and Tipton.

In North Dakota, tax rates changed for Mandan.

In Nebraska, tax rates changed for Lincoln and Chadron.

In Ohio, tax rates changed for Lake County.

In Texas, tax rates changed for Stowell, Winnie, Rocksprings, Ropesville, Stratford, Gustine, Combes, Deer Park, Granger, Lake Dallas, Panhandle, Santa Rosa, Sonora, Southlake, White Deer and Yorktown.

In Utah, tax rates changed for Murray and Logan.

In Vermont, tax rates changed for Colchester.

In Washington, tax rates changed for Tumwater TBD.

In Wyoming, tax rates changed for Weston County.

There were 25 states with ZIP code changes effective after September 2015 including Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, DC, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, North Dakota, Nebraska, New Jersey, Nevada, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia.A PDF document enumerating ZIP code additions and deletions can be made available upon request.

Angel Downs, Zip2Tax's ead tax researcher

Angel Downs, Zip2Tax’s lead tax researcher

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