Nexus in Today’s Technology Marketplace

Nexus

Nexus

nexus-workplace
Since 1992 and the Quill Corp. v. North Dakota [504 U.S. 298 (1992)] (“Quill”) ruling establishing physical presence in a state before a seller is required to collect sales or use tax, technology has redefined the marketplace. Remote sellers have enjoyed not charging tax on sales in states where they did not have a brick and mortar physical presence. The states realized the large amounts of tax dollars not collected from remote sales and have been trying to figure out how to impose taxes on these out-of-state sales. 
Amazon Laws
The Streamlined Sales Tax Governing Board and Agreement were formed in 2000 with a goal of overturning the Quill ruling and require remote sellers to charge tax. The purpose of the Agreement was the reduction of compliance burdens, especially to small remote businesses. Then a number of states began legislation known as “Amazon Laws”;  the multiple introductions of the Marketplace Fairness Act in the Senate in 2011, 2013 and 2015, and many more online sales simplification acts have made their way through local, state and federal legislation.  Before looking at current legislation and status of remote sales tax compliance, let’s take a look at the expanded definitions of what determines nexus.
Nexus

Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines nexus as a connection.

Substantial Nexus
Substantial nexus is established through the Commerce Clause requiring sufficient presence in a state prior to requiring collection of sales and use taxes. Substantial nexus was determined by physical presence (including employees) in the jurisdiction to require registration and collection of sales and use taxes. Many court cases have refined the definition of substantial nexus, the most notable case being Quill ruling. After time and significant technological advances in how business is transacted, substantial nexus and the Quill rulings have been under scrutiny and additional confusion.
Affiliate Nexus
Affiliate nexus is an evolution of the business world and the increase of online retailing. A business with an affiliate in a state, in which the business does not have any brick and mortar presence, becomes subject to sales and use tax registration and collection. Affiliation with Company A (in State C) to sell services or products with Affiliate B (in State D) who has a website in which they sell Company A products for a commission creates affiliate nexus for Company A and they are subject to sales and use tax registration and collection.
Acting as a representative for Company A creates affiliate nexus for Affiliate B in many states. The most notable case for affiliate nexus is the Borders Online v. State Bd. Of Equalization, (Cal. App. 1st Dist. 2005) which determined the acceptance of returns of purchases on-line in the brick and mortar stores created representation and therefore affiliation.
Click-Through Nexus
Click-through nexus is an extension of affiliate nexus for the growth of Internet marketing. Technology and Internet retailers are continuously improving and growing methods to increase their customer bases. Many states have implemented or are looking to implement Click-Though Nexus to keep up with the new technology. These laws presume an out-of-state retailer to have nexus in their states when a person in their state is referred to an out-of-state vendor’s website. If the referral results in a sale, nexus is created and the in-state retailer is required to collect sales & report use tax. These referrals are inclusive of the advertisement links one sees on Facebook pages.  Click ecommerceon one, purchase something, and a click-though nexus is created for the in-state retailer.
Economic Nexus
Economic nexus is the newest fight for states to impose sales and use tax on retailers not falling under other nexus definitions. Many on-line retailers (Amazon) have terminated affiliate agreements to not create affiliate nexus and subject to sales and use tax regulations. Enter economic nexus.
Economic nexus creates economic thresholds to create nexus and subject to sales and use tax regulations for nonresident retailers with no physical presence. States adopting economic nexus are creating various formulas to get a bright-line test for revenues received from the state during the tax year. Considerations for bright-line tests include analysis of the frequency, quantity, and the systematic nature of economic contacts with the state.
Notice and Reporting Requirements
A different approach to states collecting online retail use tax from in-state customers is Colorado’s Notice and Reporting Requirements. The law requires out-of-state retailers, not collecting sales tax from Colorado sales, to report transactions to state tax authorities and notify customers of the self-reporting and payment of the use tax obligation. Since there is no collection or remittance of sales or use tax required, the U.S. District Court of Appeals has held there is no violation to the Commerce Clause or the Quill ruling.
Sourcing Rules
The question of where the tax base is and who is owed tax arises through the nexus and simplification process. 
  • Destination-Based Sourcing – The tax base and rate is at the location of the consumer. 
  • Origin-Based Sourcing – The tax base and rate is at the location of the retailer. 
  • Hybrid Sourcing – The tax base and rate is at the location of the retailer, if the state is party to a distribution agreement.

The remote sale and collection of tax is a fluid world right now. Constant changes in state and federal legislation, technology and business models keep retailers and buyers on their toes. Technology moves much faster than legislation, so the legislative process may always be playing a game of “catch-up”.

Laura Hoffman

Laura Hoffman

 

Laura Hoffman is an Indirect Tax Specialist living in Las Vegas, Nevada. Laura retired from a multi-state natural gas distribution company after specializing in sales & use taxes, franchise fees, business licensing, property taxes, excise and utility taxes for over 15 years.  
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