Internet Sales Keeping Pace with Brick and Mortar

Internet sales keeping pace with local brick-and-mortar sales so far this year

Preliminary data show internet sales keeping pace with local brick-and-mortar sales so far this year. With this much revenue on the line, states are scrambling to inform the cyber-consumer about Use taxes due on internet purchases.  To date, Use tax compliance has been, to put it mildly, not good.

Whether or not states have special internet sales legislation on the books, most states require the payment of use tax on any untaxed purchase, including those made over the internet or from out-of-state vendors.

What is consumer Use tax?

Use tax is due on any taxable tangible product purchased by non-tax-exempt entities when no sales tax was collected at the time of purchase, regardless of where the item was purchased. This includes items purchased over the internet or from out-of-state sources including Amazon, eBay and others.

States scramble to get a cut of online shopping taxes

States have identified unpaid use tax as a significant loss of revenue during a time when budgets are stretched to the breaking limit. An estimate by the Streamlined Sales And Use Tax group claim $20 billion a year is being lost.

Identifying the problem and figuring out what to do about it are two different things. Most states have been at a loss as to a practical remedy. Some have included a self-reporting section on the state income tax return. Other states rely on press releases, news coverage and guilt. None of these methods have so far show much effect on compliance with some sources saying as little as 20% of these taxes are collected.

The Main Street Fairness Act

Federal legislation is being closely examined by both the senate and house to try to come up with a “fair” solution to this uncollected tax problem.

The Main Street Fairness Act, which has failed in previous years, was introduced this year by Sen. Richard Durbin (D-IL) and is currently being reviewed by the Senate Committee on Finance. The bill proposes to promote the simplification, administration and collection of sales and use taxes.

Unfortunately, like most of the issues involved with taxes, this one seems to have little chance of resolution before the year’s end. You can track the bill’s progress at http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/112/s1452.

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