Sales & Use Tax Changes for December 2016

Only one sales and/or use tax rate change in Zip2Tax products since last month. 

In Alabama, tax rates changed for East Brewton.

There were 6 states with ZIP code changes…

……in Indiana, New York, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico and Texas. 

That’s it for December!  Watch for a bigger list next month as we head into the new year.

Regards,

B.D. French, Researcher

B.D. French, Researcher

 

Sales and Use Tax Changes for November

Sales and/or use tax rates have changed in Zip2Tax products since the October updates.

In Alabama, tax rates changed for the cities of Coffeeville and York.  

  • The Coffeeville official notice can be found here.
  • The York official notice can be found here.

In Arizona, tax rates changed for the City of Globe.

  • The Mayor and Council of the City of Globe passed Ordinance No. 834. which amended the City Tax Code to increase the tax rate on retail sales from two percent (2%) to two and three-tenths percent (2.3%).  More details here AZ DOR.

zip-codes-picture

 

There were 16 states with ZIP code changes…

……in Arizona, California, Connecticut, DC, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Minnesota, North Carolina, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Puerto Rico, Texas, and Wisconsin.

 

Until next month, best regards!

B.D. French, Researcher

B.D. French, Tax Researcher

Sales And Use Tax Changes For October 2016

Sales and/or use tax rates have changed in 12 states in Zip2Tax products since September 2016.

In Alaska, tax rates changed for Sitka, Skagway, Seldovia and Whittier.
In Arkansas, tax rates changed for Bald Knob, Hartford, Wilson and Yell County.
In California, tax rates changed for Compton, Corning, Isleton, Marysville and San Jose.
In Georgia, tax rates changed for the counties of Hancock, Pulaski and Towns.
In Kansas, tax rates changed for Arkansas City and Salina.
In Missouri, tax rates changed for Audrain County, Cedar County, Crawford County, Bourbon, Jasper County, Knox County, Macon County, Ripley County, Cameron, Bernie, Country Club Hills, Ferguson, Fulton, Goodman, Louisiana, Malden, Marceline, Maryville, Oak Grove, Osborn, Paris, Richmond, Seymour, Steele, Trenton, Verona, Winona, Clark County, Union, and Stoddard County.
In North Carolina, tax rates changed for Cherokee County and Jackson County.
In Ohio, tax rates changed for Clinton County.
In Oklahoma, tax rates changed for Holdenville, Medicine Park, Webbers Falls, Sayre, Mooreland, Shattuck, West Siloam Springs, Blackwell, Kay County, Kansas, and Colcord.
In Texas, tax rates changed for Brownwood, Early, Buffalo Gap, Crystal City, Skellytown, Burton, Cranfills Gap, Double Oak, Follett, Hallsville, Jacinto City, Pattison, Three Rivers, Vega, Waskom, Danbury, Elmendorf, Krum, Millsap, Moulton, and Hardin.
In Vermont, tax rates changed for Brandon.
In Washington, tax rates changed for Ellensburg, Mattawa and Othello.

ZIP code changes too….

There were 13 states with ZIP code changes effective after September 2016 including D.C., Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Texas.
 Until next month…..
bd-french

B.D. French, Z2T Researcher

 

 

New Year’s sales tax updates effective January 1, 2016

Sales tax updates: 19 states have sales and use tax rates which have changed in Zip2Tax products since December 2015. 

There are sales tax updates in Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, New Mexico, Nevada, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas and Utah effective Jan. 1st.

In Alabama, tax rates changed for Rockford, Luverne and Waterloo.

In Arkansas, tax rates changed for Bald Knob, Brinkley, Gillham, Harrisburg, Viola and Crittenden County.

In Arizona, tax rates changed for Apache Junction, Phoenix and Prescott Valley.

In Colorado, tax rates changed for Bayfield, Bennett, Fraser, Lyons, Ouray, the Counties of Alamosa and Chaffee, Gunnison Valley RTA, Montezuma County Hospital District, Colorado Springs, Crested Butte and Greeley.

In Florida, tax rates changed for the Counties of Jackson, Walton, Hernando and Saint Johns.

In Georgia, tax rates changed for Hancock County.

In Illinois, tax rates changed for Morton Grove, Posen, Stickney, Bellwood, Bloomington, Herrin, Hopkins Park, Matteson, Shorewood and Cook County.

In Kansas, tax rates changed for Shawnee.

In Louisiana, tax rates changed for Folsom, Lake Charles and Merryville.

In Minnesota, tax rates changed for Rochester and the Counties of Otter Tail and Freeborn.

In Missouri, tax rates changed for Carthage, New Madrid County, Chillicothe, Holt County, Saline County and Aurora.

In North Dakota, tax rates changed for Alexander and Center.

In New Mexico, tax rates changed for Maxwell, Springer, De Baca County, Eddy County, Vaughn, Lincoln County, Mora County, Otero County, Jemez Springs, Farmington and Kirtland.

In Nevada, tax rates changed for Clark County.

In Ohio, tax rates changed for Portage County.

In Oklahoma, tax rates changed for Bartlesville, Gore, Hollis, Norman, Del City, Marshall County and Pittsburg County.

In South Dakota, tax rates changed for Astoria.

In Texas, tax rates changed for Corral City and Goliad.

In Utah, tax rates changed for Dutch John.

There were 13 states with ZIP code changes effective after December 2015 including California, Connecticut, Florida, Iowa, Indiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, New Jersey, Oklahoma, Texas and West Virginia. A PDF document enumerating ZIP code additions and deletions can be made available upon request.

Angel Downs, Zip2Tax's ead tax researcher

Angel Downs, Zip2Tax’s lead tax researcher

Sales taxes changed in four states for December 2015

Sales taxes changed in Zip2Tax products for four states since November

In Alabama, tax rates changed for Randolph County.

In Colorado, tax rates changed for Winter Park.

In Louisiana, tax rates changed for Lafayette Parish.

In New York, tax rates changed for Chautauqua County and Jefferson County.

There were 10 states with ZIP code changes effective after November 2015 including the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, New Jersey, Ohio and Texas. A PDF document enumerating ZIP code additions and deletions can be made available upon request.

Angel Downs, Zip2Tax's ead tax researcher

Angel Downs, Zip2Tax’s lead tax researcher

Washington State sales tax held hostage

Conditional legislation holds the fate of the Washington state sales tax

Washington voters recently approved an unusual ballot initiative which effectively holds the state sales tax hostage unless legislators propose a separate constitutional amendment related to future tax increases. Assuming the initiative survives an ongoing court challenge, the Washington legislature has until next April to approve a second referendum for the 2016 election. Otherwise, residents will see an immediate 1% cut in the statewide sales tax.

state sales taxMany states allow voters to enact legislation directly through an initiative process. In Washington, voters may initiate ordinary legislation but not amendments to the state’s constitution, which must be proposed by the legislature. This has frustrated efforts by anti-tax activists in the state to legislate a “supermajority” requirement for tax increases. A “supermajority” means each house of the Washington legislature would have to approve any future tax increase by a two-thirds vote rather than a simple majority. Although voters have passed a number of supermajority initiatives in recent years, they have either been suspended by the legislature or struck down as unconstitutional by the Washington Supreme Court. In a 2013 decision, the court held any supermajority rule required a constitutional amendment.

Since the legislature will not approve such an amendment on its own, supermajority proponents switched tactics. They proposed a new initiative, I-1366, which mandates a 1% cut in the state sales tax – reducing it from 6.5% to 5.5% – unless the legislature “first proposes” an amendment to the state constitution which would “require that for any tax increase, either the voters approve the increase or two-thirds of each house of the legislature approve the increase.” The initiative sets an April 15, 2016, for the legislature to act.

In the recent Nov. 3 election, Washington voters approved I-1366 by a margin of about 45,000 votes. But that does not mean the controversial measure will become law. Opponents of the law, including many local governments, have already filed a lawsuit challenging the initiative’s constitutionality. Specifically, opponents claim I-1366 is “beyond the scope of the people’s initiative power.” This past August, a Seattle judge declined to remove the measure from the ballot. On Sept. 4, the Washington Supreme Court upheld that decision.

The Supreme Court did not settle the underlying constitutional challenge to I-1366. Rather, it held the purpose of the measure was “not sufficiently clear” enough to warrant injunctive relief before the election. The lack of clarity refers to the dispute over what I-1366 actually proposes. Opponents argue it is an improper attempt to amend the state constitution by initiative. But proponents claim it is merely “conditional legislation” whose primary purpose is to cut the sales tax.

Indeed, conditional legislation is a common governmental practice. Congress often uses such legislation to condition federal funds on certain acts by states or private parties. For example, states raised their legal drinking age to 21 after Congress made it a condition for continuing to receive federal highway funds. But this is likely the first time a voter initiative has conditioned a state’s ability to collect taxes on a future legislative action.

S.M. Oliva is a writer living in Charlottesville, Virginia. He edits the international legal blog PrivyCouncil.info

Four states greet November with sales tax changes

Sales tax changes occurred in four states in Zip2Tax products since October 2015.

In Arizona, tax rates changed for Jerome, Sierra Vista and Mammoth.

In Tennessee, tax rates changed for Hardin County, Henry County and Dunlap.

In Wisconsin, tax rates changed for Brown County.

In Wyoming, tax rates changed for Converse County.

There were 28 states with ZIP code changes effective after October 2015 including Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina, Nebraska, New Jersey, Nevada, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Washington, Wisconsin and West Virginia. A PDF document enumerating ZIP code additions and deletions can be made available upon request.

Angel Downs, Zip2Tax's ead tax researcher

Angel Downs, Zip2Tax’s lead tax researcher

Sales and use tax changes for October 2015

Sales and use tax rates have changed in 16 states in Zip2Tax products since September 2015.

In Alaska, tax rates changed for Sitka, Skagway, Seldovia and Whittier.

In Alabama, tax rates changed for Tallapoosa County, Grove Hill, Fayette, Evergreen and Dodge City.

In Arkansas, tax rates changed for Brinkley, El Dorado, and Western Grove.

In California, tax rates changed for Greenbrae and Monterey.

In Kansas, tax rates changed for Andover, Belleville, Buhler, Cherryvale, Eudora, Haven, LaCrosse, Lecompton, Meriden and Bourbon County.

In Louisiana, tax rates changed for Folsom.

In Minnesota, tax rates changed for Lyon and Scott Counties.

In Missouri, tax rates changed for Dent County, Salem, Henry County, Laclede County, New Madrid County, Sedalia, Bertrand, Bethany, Concordia, Country Club Hills, Crystal City, Fair Play, Galena, Hazelwood, Kirkwood, Miner, Rolla, St. John, Stanberry and Tipton.

In North Dakota, tax rates changed for Mandan.

In Nebraska, tax rates changed for Lincoln and Chadron.

In Ohio, tax rates changed for Lake County.

In Texas, tax rates changed for Stowell, Winnie, Rocksprings, Ropesville, Stratford, Gustine, Combes, Deer Park, Granger, Lake Dallas, Panhandle, Santa Rosa, Sonora, Southlake, White Deer and Yorktown.

In Utah, tax rates changed for Murray and Logan.

In Vermont, tax rates changed for Colchester.

In Washington, tax rates changed for Tumwater TBD.

In Wyoming, tax rates changed for Weston County.

There were 25 states with ZIP code changes effective after September 2015 including Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, DC, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, North Dakota, Nebraska, New Jersey, Nevada, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia.A PDF document enumerating ZIP code additions and deletions can be made available upon request.

Angel Downs, Zip2Tax's ead tax researcher

Angel Downs, Zip2Tax’s lead tax researcher

Sales tax rate changes for September 2015

Sales tax rate changes for September include two states: Alabama and New York; along with Zip code changes in 12 states in Zip2Tax products since August 2015.

In Alabama, tax rates changed for Midway.

In New York, tax rates changed for Yonkers.

There were 12 states with ZIP code changes effective after August 2015 including Alaska, Arizona, DC, Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts, Michigan, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, South Carolina and Virginia. A PDF document enumerating ZIP code additions and deletions can be made available upon request.

Angel Downs, Zip2Tax's ead tax researcher

Angel Downs, Zip2Tax’s lead tax researcher

August sales and use tax rates changes

August sales and use tax rates have changed in two states in Zip2Tax products since July 2015.

In Alabama, tax rates changed for Hayneville.

In Arizona, tax rates changed for Benson.

There were 13 states with ZIP code changes effective after July 2015 including Alaska, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, North Carolina, North Dakota, New York, Ohio, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas and Wisconsin. A PDF document enumerating ZIP code additions and deletions can be made available upon request.

Angel Downs, Zip2Tax's ead tax researcher

Angel Downs, Zip2Tax’s lead tax researcher

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